CDDM Introduction Page 4


Students need to know what they are expected to learn and how they will be assessed. Making the learning transparent is a crucial component of the student centered classroom.
CDDM Box 4: Develop Transparency So Students Can Navigate Their Own Learning
  • Identify desired learning (standards)
  • Create a system to allow students to chart progress through standards
  • Unpack standards
  • Organize standards
  • Chart progress
  • Recording and reporting
  • Create assessments to show proficiency using rubrics and scoring guides
District Formats























Additional Resources:
Common Core Maine has adopted the Common Core standards and this is the MSAD 15 curriculum.

Maps MSAD 15 has mapped the curriculum so that learning expectations are transparent. If the map for your content or level is not present, that might mean that it is still being mapped. Ask your administrator or department head if this work is being done.
The district has adopted a specific way of numbering and labeling standards. This protocol should be followed by everyone in the district so that students experience continuity.
MSAD 15 created a uniform template for unpacking the learning targets onto a matrix. Remember, a matrix is a way for students to see the learning pathway. It should show what they need to do or practice in order to develop proficiency. It is developmental, so it is numbered 1 to 4. When you have developed this into an assessment rubric, with students, the rubric should be numbered from 4 to 1 so that students are viewing the performance holistically and are viewing the high end of the achievement scale first.
Once you've unpacked the standard onto a matrix, it's time to unpack the standard with students. There are various methods, but the essential goal is to make sure that every student understands exactly what they should know or be able to do when they are done with this portion of their studies.
The 4-1 scale is different than the traditional scoring system in s couple of ways. The score represent how a student has performed on the performance of a standard when they have completed all of their formative work and are ready to be evaluated. The score only reflects the learning progress on that standard and is intended to allow both teacher and student to monitor learning and exchange feedback when it is useful to the learner. Other characteristics, such as being on time, doing outside work, or participation are not part of this score. Those interpersonal characteristics will be evaluated by the Guiding Principles map. The 4-1 scale is strictly a reporting of progress. It is expected that everyone will be at a 1 or 2 much of the time. Earning a 3, proficiency, means that a student is ready to advance. A 4 represents a high level of application. These scores do not equate to the A-F scoring method and should not be interpreted that way. The case for a model based in feedback is part of the motivational theory espoused by education researcher Robert J. Marzano. The Case For Classroom Assessment
Creating assessments to show proficiency by using rubrics and scoring guides enables students to clearly understand how they are being assessed. K-8 teachers are currently creating these in math and 5-8 ELA.
Creating assessments to show proficiency by using rubrics and scoring guides enables students to clearly understand how they are being assessed. K-8 teachers are currently creating these in math and 5-8 ELA.
EDUCATEThe district began using Educate in K-8 in the fall of 2011. There are various levels of implementation at this time, but Educate will eventually house documentation of student progress, units, lessons, and other school data. All teachers, K-8, are reporting progress on a 4-1 scale where 3 represents proficiency in a standard.


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